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Agriculture Course Offerings

AG 102 Principles of Animal Science. 3 hours credit. Study of the basic principles relating to animal agriculture and livestock industry. Includes the types, purposes and products of livestock; and principles of selection, nutrition, reproduction, management and marketing.

AG 107 Microcomputers in Agriculture. 3 hours credit. This course introduces students to the various uses of microcomputers in agriculture and ag-related areas. Emphasis is placed on application of microcomputer technology to agriculture business planning, record keeping, problem solving and general management decisions. Basic computer functions, hardware components and selection, and software selection are included.

AG 108 Feeder Livestock Production Management. 3 hours credit. This course deals with managing feeder livestock including hands-on experience. Labs relating to acquisition, processing, herd health, nutrition, marketing, and facility needs of livestock in the growing stage of production are utilized. Two hours lecture/discussion and two hours laboratory per week.

AG 109 Breeding Livestock Production Management. 3 hours credit. This course outlines production techniques relating to breeding livestock. Reproduction, nutrition, selection, handling, housing, and husbandry practices are included. Two hour lecture/laboratory and two hours laboratory per week.

AG 110 Farm Animal Artificial Insemination. 1-3 hours credit. The theory and practice of modern animal artificial insemination. Designed to make the student proficient in artificial insemination and knowledgeable of basic reproduction management.

AG 111 Agriculture in Society. 2 hours credit. The history, trends and opportunities in agriculture, and career areas in agriculture are presented. Resource people will discuss their occupations in agriculture and how they serve the agricultural community.

AG 120 Agriculture Economics. 3 hours credit. The study and application of basic economic principles to solve agriculture-related problems in business, farm and industry are presented. The relationship of the agriculture sector to the rest of the U.S. and world economy is included.

AG 133 Livestock Selection I. 3 hour credit. The course includes the evaluation of livestock including comparative judging, grading, classification, market types, breeding and selection of livestock. Two hours lab-lecture a week.

AG 134 Livestock Selection II. 3 hours credit. Prerequisite: AG 133. This course increases the intensity of live animal selection based on several factors in addition to phenotype. This class focuses primarily on performance data and testing, the relationship of marketing to selection, breeding programs, and many other selection techniques.

AG 136 Livestock Judging Lab I. 2 hour credit. This course is to be taken in conjunction with Livestock Selection I by those students desiring in-depth experience in livestock judging. The major emphasis of the course is on livestock judging including the presentation and evaluation of oral reasons. A major portion of class time is spent evaluating and placing live classes of livestock in the field. Collegiate competition is included.

AG 137 Livestock Judging Lab II. 2 hour credit. Prerequisite: AG 136. A continuation of Livestock Judging Lab I providing in-depth training and experience in livestock judging.

AG 142 Crop and Soil Management. 3 hours credit. This course covers production and management practices of crops and soils commonly found in the Midwest United States. Topics included are: management of a crop from planting to harvest, soil conservation and fertility, economic decision making, and plant pest control.

AG 211 Fundamentals of Livestock Nutrition. 3 hours credit. A study of the principles of animal nutrition and their application in livestock feeding. Includes nutritive value of feeds, the metabolic processes, and basic ration formulation.

AG 212 Meat Science Fundamentals. 2 hours credit. This class is designed to outline, in detail, the meat industry from the basic concepts of how tissue structures develop into a carcass, to the final marketing channels of retail meat cuts. This class will also include the influence society can place on this cycle.

AG 213 Introduction to Food Science. 3 hours credit. This course will enable the student to apply biological, chemical and physical principles to the study of converting raw agricultural products into food products suitable for human consumption. The student will recognize the nutritional and chemical properties and reactions of food components, identify pathogens and microorganisms related to food spoilage, and describe the principles that make food safe for human consumption.

AG 215 Financial Management in Agriculture. 3 hours credit. Principles and practices of financial management of a farm or ranch including record keeping and record analysis, cash flow and other budgets, financial statements, financing, and basics of tax and estate planning. Analysis of costs and selection of a farm enterprise are also covered.

AG 216 Livestock Health and Disease. 3 hours credit. This course is an introduction to the animal health industry and places emphasis on anatomy and physiology, immunity, and equipment used for treatment and prevention.

AG 217 Marketing Agricultural Products. 3 hours credit. This course is an introduction to the technology, pricing, and supply and demand of agricultural marketing. Also, analysis of opportunities relating to various marketing procedures based on individual producer needs is included.

AG 218 Principles of Futures Markets. 3 hours credit. This courses offers a study of the principles of futures markets, types of market transactions, terminology and market analysis. During the course students will be involved in simulated transactions in the market to gain practical experience.

AG 219 Swine Management. 3 hours credit. This course studies the principles of economical pork production including breeding, reproduction, nutrition, health, housing, and marketing and management of swine production units.

AG 220 Crop Science. 4 hours credit. Study of the principles of crop production including plant structure and properties, pests and diseases, soil properties, and management practices of common field crops. Three hours lecture/discussion and two hours lab a week.

AG 221 Beef Management. 3 hours credit. A course applying the principles of nutrition, breeding, reproduction and merchandising to beef production. Management systems of raising, growing and finishing beef cattle are emphasized.

AG 227 Special Topics. 1-3 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Topics of specific interest to the student will be developed. These topics will be established by the student's needs or requirements. Areas of specific needs will be pursued and instructional material that lends itself to current trends or topics needed to supplement normal classroom instruction will be offered.

AG 230 Range Management. 3 hours credit. Fundamental ecological principles of production, conservation and utilization of grasslands. Grazing capacity, survey methods, management practices and grass identification are included.

AG 236 Livestock Judging Lab III. 2 hour credit. Prerequisite: AG 137. A continuation of Livestock Judging Labs I and II. This course provides a course for sophomores who are on the Livestock Judging team.

AG 237 Livestock Judging Lab IV. 2 hour credit. Prerequisite: AG 236. A continuation of Livestock Judging Labs I and II. This course follows Livestock Judging III to provide in-depth training and experience in livestock judging.

AG 240 Livestock Rations. 3 hours credit. Course includes the formulation and calculation of livestock rations based on the requirements of the different livestock species and feeding of livestock.

AG 245 Horse Science. 3 hours credit. A study of the phases of horse production including types and breeds of horses, selection, breeding, nutrition, health, facilities and related management practices.

AG 246 Special Topics. 3 hours credit each. Prerequisite: Approval of division dean and instructor. Topics of specific interest the student will be developed. These topics will be established by students needs or requirements. Areas of specific needs will be pursued and instructional material that lends itself to current trends or topics that are needed to supplement normal classroom instruction will be offered.

AG 247 Equine Production. 3 hours credit. Prerequisite: AG 245. This course is designed to expand on Equine Management specifically in the area of reproduction. Topics covered include: genetics, selection characteristics, selection methods, stallion management, brood mare management, and foal management and development.

AG 249 Horsemanship. 3 hours credit. Prerequisite: AG 245. Horsemanship is designed to explain the knowledge of horses in the direction of handling and training. Topics could include: styles of riding, conformation of the horse as it relates to performance, task, safe methods of handling the horse, training principles and stable management.

AG 275 Livestock Concepts and Practices. 3 hours credit. This course focuses on advanced livestock management practices. Included are handling, reproduction, breeding, nutrition, herd health and the collection of accurate records. Two hours lecture/discussions and two hours laboratory per week.

AG 285 Livestock Business Management. 3 hours credit. The course analyzes marketing opportunities, retained ownership through finishing livestock to compositional endpoints, feeding animals in performance trials, and developing females for entry into the breeding herd are integrated components of the course. The student reviews financial implications involved in raising livestock providing facilities, waste handling and with purchases and sales. Two hours lecture/discussion and two hours laboratory per week.

AG 193 and 194 Internship I and II. 6 hours credit each. Integrate education with on-the-job experience (paid positions). See page 68 for a complete description of these courses.

AG 197, 198, 297 and 298 Cooperative Education I, II, III and IV. 6 hours credit each. Integrate education with on-the-job experience (paid positions). See page 68 for a complete description of these courses.