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The Wilton Method
Cake Decorating Basics

In this class you will learn how to bake a great cake, make icing, how to use decorating tips to make stars, borders, and pipe lettering to make that special occasion a success and wow your family and friends. Jenna Vice is a Wilton Method Instructor and has 4 years of experience creating masterpieces.

NC165 Wednesdays, Jan. 22nd - Feb. 12
6-8pm
Butler of El Dorado
$35.00 per student
Additional kit supplies required Approx cost $35.00

Flowers and Cake Design

Learn how to make beautiful flowers such as pansies, lilies, daffodils, roses and many, many, more! In this class you will learn how to make royal icing so you can make these incredible flowers ahead of time at your convenience. Learn how to make more advanced borders and the stunning basket weave design.

NC166 Wednesdays, Feb 19 - Mar. 12
6-8pm
Butler of El Dorado
$35.00 per student
Additional kit supplies required Approx cost $35.00

Gum Paste and Fondant

Learn how to cover a cake in fondant. Discover how to create amazing hand-shaped flowers, borders and accents such as an adorable bow, breathtaking roses, carnations, the stunning calla lily, rosebuds, daisies, and more!

NC167 Wednesdays, Mar 26 - Apr 16
6-8pm
Butler of El Dorado
$40.00 per student
Additional kit supplies required Approx cost $35.00

Advanced Gum Paste and Fondant

You will learn to create life-like gum paste flowers, petals, leaves and decorations such as the gerbera daisy, star gazer lily, sweet peas and many more. Learn how to shape these gorgeous flowers into bouquets and flower sprays that can be beautifully placed on cakes.

NC168 Wednesdays, Apr 23 - May 14
6-8pm
Butler of El Dorado
$40.00 per student
Additional kit supplies required Approx cost $35.00

Kansas Humanities Council
Kansas Humanities Council
Talk About Literature in Kansas
The 1930s
NC103

We have all seen the pictures: long lines of heavy-jacketed people waiting for handouts in breadlines, or crowding counters hoping for a job; the careworn visage of the Okie mother with her hungry children huddled around her; the milling crowds in front of closed-down banks; the ramshackle shacks of the Hoovervilles that sprouted in American cities; the dustbowl cloud descending on the Plains town; stark images of the hungry, the unemployed, the neglected.

For American history, the 1930s was a pivotal, critical era. In the early years of the decade, a range of fundamental challenges confronted the nation: the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, Prohibition, and radicalized politics on
undermined the security of democratic institutions. Overseas, the path toward war was growing increasingly clear.

And yet the later years of the decade are equally remarkable for the ways America mapped a route out of the crisis. After Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s victory in the presidential election of 1932, he responded to the economic meltdown by initiating the New Deal, featuring both the creation of a system to ease the problems of those most hurt by the depression (the unemployed, the retired, and the poor) and direct government intervention to re-energize a damaged economy, ranging from reopening banks and reorganizing agriculture to government job creation to stimulate the economy.

The thirties were also a period of remarkable artistic efflorescence across the full spectrum of arts. In Hollywood, the decade featured a new growth of film genres within the studio system. The classic Hollywood musical, the screwball comedy, the gangster film, major studio horror movies (Dracula, Frankenstein, Wolf Man), and animated films (including Walt Disney’s first work) all got their start in the decade. The decade saw the rise of regionalist painters like Grant Wood, John Steuart Curry, and Thomas Hart Benton and photographers Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, and Walker Evans. Musical forms, especially those rooted in the fusion of African-American music with mainstream culture – the blues, jazz, swing -- continued to develop. And the literary output of the decade ranged from the novels of John Steinbeck, to new African-American voices like Richard Wright, to the invention of the hard-boiled detective.

The Day of the Locust
by Nathanael West (1939)

“It is hard to laugh at the need for beauty and romance, no matter how tasteless, even horrible, the
results of that need are. But it is easy to sigh,” declares Tod, the narrator of this Hollywood satire. Tod is a painter, but his work is background and costumes; aspiration rather than achievement defines him. His painting, The Burning of Los Angeles, foreshadows the novel’s violent climax. 126 pp.

Wednesday, Feb. 12
2:00-3:00pm
Butler of El Dorado
No fee-this class is made possible by a grant from the Kansas Humanities Council.
Discussion leader: Kim Stanley

Mules and Men
by Zora Neale Hurston (1935)

Hurston recalled in her introduction: “I was glad when somebody told me, ‘You may go and collect Negro folklore.’” And the resulting book established the territory she would continue to explore in both fiction and nonfictional forms, the shaping of African-American identity in the contexts of both the experience of the South and the Great Migration to the cities of the north. 246 pp.

Wednesday, March 5
2:00-3:00pm
Butler of El Dorado
No fee-this class is made possible by a grant from the Kansas Humanities Council.
Discussion leader: Sandra Wiechert

The Worst Hard Time
by Timothy Egan (2006)

Egan describes the first of the new storms that would come to define the Dust Bowl: “Wasn’t a sandstorm….And it wasn’t a hailstorm, thou it certainly brought with it a
dark, threatening sky.... It rolled, like a mobile hill of crud, and it was black.” Egan provides a masterful overview of the dust storms and their consequences for agriculture
and people on the Great Plains. 312 pp.

>NC103
Wednesday, April. 16
2:00-3:00pm
Butler of El Dorado
Discussion leader: Tom Prasch
No fee-this class is made possible by a grant from the Kansas Humanities Council.

J R Cowell Images
Shoot and Show

This class will cover the basic concepts of perspective, rule of thirds, depth of field and portraiture. During this hands-on class students will start with a classroom lesson and then move to an assignment. A DSLR or point and shoot camera is required. Each class critique will be given and instruction presented on improving the skill. The class will be taught by Jeff Cowell of JR Cowell Images, accomplished photographer with over 10 years of experience.

NC169 Jan 27, Feb 3, 10, 17,& 24
6:30-8:30pm
Butler of Andover
$60.00 per student

Shoot and Show II

This class will focus on long exposure photography or time-exposure photography. This involves using a long-duration shutter speed to sharply capture the stationary elements of images while blurring, smearing, or obscuring the moving elements. The paths of moving light sources become clearly visible. Students will explore framing, balance and simplicity. A DSLR or point and shoot camera is required. Each class critique will be given and instruction presented on improving the skill. The class will be taught by Jeff Cowell of JR Cowell Images, accomplished photographer with over 10 years of experience.

NC170 Mar 3, 10, 24, 31, Apr 7
6:30-8:30pm
Butler of Andover
$60.00 per student

Beginning Computers

Never used a computer before? Feel like computer terms are written in a different language? This is your chance to learn about the basics of computers. This class is intended for those who have little or no computer experience and Karen Rogers will provide instruction on Basic Computer Components, Hardware and Software, Basic Computer Functions, Managing Files, Navigating the Internet and Troubleshooting Problems

NC126 Saturdays, Jan. 25, Feb 8, 12:30 - 3:30
February 22, 12:30 - 3:30
Butler of Andover
$45.00 per student

Beginning Computers II

This class is for those who know how to turn the computer on, terminology, use the mouse and navigate windows. Karen Rogers, instructor, will cover topics such as:Searching the Internet and sending emails, Microsoft Word in documents, tables and text, Software, Word Processing-formatting documents, tables and text, Microsoft Excel working with budgets and lists.  Each student will work individually on a computer with the instructor's guidance.

NC144 Saturdays, March 8 & 29 12:30 - 3:30
April 12, 12:30 - 3:30
Butler of Andover
$45.00 per student

TEAS Preparation Course

Melissa Elliott will instruct potential health care workers, preparing them to take the Test of Essential Academic Skills(TEAS)exam. This exam is required for entrance into many programs such as nursing and dental hygiene. The course will run for 10 weeks and will cover test taking strategies and the four sections of the TEAS exam. The sections on the exam include reading, math science and english.


NC101 Thursday, Jan. 30-Apr. 13 5-8pm
Butler of El Dorado
or
NC102 Fri., Jan. 31-Apr. 11 9am-Noon
Butler of Andover
$30.00 per student
Additional book ISBN: 978-1-933107-98-1 approx $66.00
This book can be purchased in the Butler Bookstore.

Native American Indian Genealogy

This is a genealogy workshop in which Jason Felihkatubbe will explore various resources available to those looking for Native American Indian ancestors and assist students in their own research.

NC120 Saturdays, Feb. 1
Noon - 3:00 P.M.
Butler of El Dorado
$15.00 per person

Basic RiderCourse

This class will teach the participant how to operate a motorcycle safely, with emphasis on special skills and mental attitude for dealing with traffic. Before enrolling in this course participants must be able to balance and ride a bicycle, read, listen and speak English at the sixth grade level. Tuition is $250.00per driver, El Dorado, $240.00 in Andover and Wichita. Classes are offered beginning January 3rd .  Weekday classes are available in West Wichita at 303 N. West Street.

Intermediate RiderCourse

Using your own motorcycle, you’ll put into practice the techniques of managing traction, stopping quickly, cornering and swerving. Before enrolling participants must be a licensed motorcycle operator and able to read, listen and speak English at a sixth grade level. Tuition is $100.00 per driver. This 5 hour class is offered beginning Mar 23rd in Wichita.

Advanced RiderCourse

The overall aim is to provide rider development in the areas of risk management, decision-making, riding strategies, and rider behavior and choices. This includes learner activities to foster gains in knowledge, skill, attitude, values and habits. Before enrolling participants must be a licensed motorcycle operator and able to read, listen and speak English at a sixth grade level. Tuition is $150.00 per driver. This 8 hour class is offered March 24th in Wichita.

Please check the website for a class schedule.  You can enroll in any of these motorcycle courses by visiting www.TeachMeToRide.com or by calling Motorcycle Training Specialists, Inc. at (316) 683-2342.